Posts

You'll Never Work in This Industry Again!

Early in my career (over 30 years ago, in fact), I remember a manager saying to me and my team, "I'll see to it that you will never work in this industry again." He was a project manager, with a very large company, in charge of many vendors. I was with one of the vendors. He had heard that a competitor had made a play to steal us. Talent poaching was indeed rampant at that time. He was furious because he thought that he "owned" us. "I'll destroy you," he added. His words certainly sent a chill through me. But I remember thinking, "What a cliched thing to say. What a jerk." He thought he was king. He didn't scare me. Looking back on this incident, his words were an empty threat. They probably came from his fear and insecurity. This was the first time that I encountered what might be termed a "career killer." Career killers are points along your career journey where a serious disruption derails you. A career killer can be an…

Making a SOUND Decision

We make a lot of decisions in our lives. Some are daily decisions like "What will I wear today?" Others have more long-lasting import such as "Should I accept this job offer?" or "Will I get married?" When it comes to the big and important choices in life, what makes a good decision? For many, it's a rapid one. A decision made quickly so that action can be taken. Rapid decisions are necessary in many situations. Think of a battlefield. Or an emergency such as a fire. Some years ago, the concept of a RAPID decision making model was developed where the letters identified different roles related to a decision: R for Recommendation, A for Approval, P for Performer, I for Input, and D for Deliberation. Like SMART for goal setting, RAPID is a useful tool for thinking through the various players that may have an impact on a decision. But unlike SMART, it doesn't seem to really cover the process of decision making itself. So here is a new model that I ca…

The Leader's Calling

Professionally, I have worked for well over thirty years in the field of leadership development, developing leaders in businesses of all kinds, even in non-profits and in religious organizations too.
In addition, as a career coach, I am also a believer and a proponent in the idea of a "calling," a purpose that expresses your talents and passions here in this Life.
My colleague Nick Heap calls it your "core process:"
"Core Process starts from the idea that, when we are made, we have a job to do, a unique and specific job that fits you, that you were designed to do. When you do it, it goes astonishingly well, you are happy and energized, and you feel the most alive. Your core process shows you what you are here on the planet to do. Core Process is simply a way of describing what your job is, your purpose, your central and unique talent."
My colleague John Scherer says that your calling has an inside and an outside:
On the inside are "your natural abilities …

Discover the clown within

Image
How do you feel about clowns?

Some like them. Others are terrified of them.

Many years ago, probably back in late 70's/early 80's, I met someone who was seriously dedicated to clown work. Doing clown work was her ministry.
When she talked about it, you had to be impressed. She was part of an international network of clowns (I can't recall its name, sorry) that had conventions, speakers, workshops, publications etc.
Some of the fragments I can recall from her sharing...being a clown is serious work...a ministry...with the power to help relax, de-stress, laugh, let go, imagine and heal.
I read a piece online about clown work that discusses "discovering the clown within."
While I wouldn't claim to be a clown (in the official sense of my friend the clown), I have definitely done my share of clowning around. Who is making faces in the family photo album? Me.
Fooling around has always come naturally to me. I love it when some silly stunt of mine makes others laugh.
Making…

Impacting the Culture - Part 3

Image
While there is no silver bullet, no one magic answer for improving the culture of your organization, in this series (part 1, part 2), I have offered a number of ideas for getting started.  There are ways that have been tried and tested. It is possible to undertake the journey toward impacting your organization's culture in a meaningful way.


"If you want to change the culture, you will have to start by changing yourself."


To sum up, here is a little "magic"


Mirror - Look into the mirror. It all starts there. Know thyself.

Assess - Assess your own current impact on your organization's culture.

Gather - Gather input from the system, members and stakeholders.

Imagine - Imagine your organization at its best.

Convene - Convene everyone around making positive change.

So go forth and make a difference in your culture!

Bonus Thought:  One additional idea came from a colleague this morning:  Follow the example of the TV show Undercover Boss. Go to your front-line and find o…

Impacting the Culture - Part 2

Image
Continuing with some additional tips for members of a Board and the executive team that want to have a positive impact on the culture of their organization, here are some ideas for the next phase of the process.

4. Use your Imagination - The poet once said "Nothing happens unless first a dream." Leaders, What is your dream for the culture of your organization? Imagine it at its best. What are the values?  What are the actions?  What are the outcomes?

5. Gather the System - With a nod to Marv Weisbord who gave us the maxim "Get the whole system in the room," leaders should extend an invitation to all the members of their organization, as well as all key stakeholders, to join in the process started in point # 4. Get everyone's imaginations activated.

Get people into groups. Equip each group with flipcharts, markers, and facilitators. Give them the "green light" to unfetter their thinking about how great the organization can be.

6. Think Big, Start Smal…

Impacting the Culture - Part 1

Image
A colleague of mine is writing an article about culture and how members of the Board and the executive team impact it. He asked for input on tips and ideas to include.

In thinking about some tips for his consideration, a few occurred to me.

1. Start with You - Because an organization's culture reflects the actions and values of its leaders, it seems to me that before anything else, a leader must start with the person that he or she sees in the mirror each morning. As the Michael Jackson song lyric says: “If you want to make the world a better place, take a look at yourself, and make a change.”

2. Everything You Do Teaches - As a member of the Board or the executive team, you set the tone and the pace for your organization. Your actions (and inaction's) carry weight. Your influence is felt. As my pastor Fr. Doug Haefner is fond of saying to his staff and to the pastoral council, "Everything you do teaches."

3. Be mindful of Yourself - Are you aware of your presence? O…