Life is What You Write It


For as long as I can remember, I've always been writing. From comic strips when I was a child, to blog posts now as a professional, writing is one of the things I just  do.

My mother had a saying, "Life is what you make it." I've carried that with me all these years.
I also realized that, for me, Life is what you write it. 
Author Maxine Hong Kingston wrote:  "I have no idea how people who don't write endure their lives."
That's an interesting statement, suggesting that writing is a basic coping mechanism, a way to meet life as it comes.  Writing is a way to encounter and make sense of life.
American writer Henry Miller wrote:  "Writing, like life itself, is a voyage of discovery. The writer takes the path in order eventually to become that path himself."
I like that. Often when I write, I have no idea what I am going to say. Or where I will end up. Writing really is a process of discovery.

Writing about writing, the author Henry Miller wrote: "Every line and word is vitally connected with my life."

Yes, I get that. By writing, I am writing my own life.

Miller went on:  "Like (a) spider I return again and again to the task, conscious that the web I am spinning is made of my own substance, that it will never fail me, never run dry."

Though writers sometimes experience "writers block," I've found, in my own life as a writer, that Miller is right:  the well never runs dry. There is always more there.
Professor of art education Viktor Lowenfeld declared:  "It is most important that" each person "formulate his own thoughts, not what is important to anyone else, but what is significant to him so that he may confront himself with his own world of experiences."
Or in other words, How can I know what I mean, until I see what I say?
With heart, mind, and pen poised
in the charged air
above the blank paper,
anything can happen.
Anything.
The writer must be wary, vigilant, hopeful, armed.
This is the first in a series on writing and creativity by Terrence Seamon. Follow him on twitter @tseamon

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